2 Factor Authentication

We have just enabled 2 Factor Authentication for all users. You can access it on the 33mail dashboard settings page.

To activate it on your account you will need a Google Authenticator compatible app such as Authy.

Simply scan the QR code with your app, enter the token and click the ‘Verify & Activate’ button.

If you then log out and log back in again you will be required to input your auth token after your password entry.

 

A new Email Forwarding Service for your domain by 33mails creator

I have been working for the last few months on a new service to address the need for a simple email forwarding service for your domain which allows users to be onboarded in as simple a way as possible. This stems from a few requests we have had from 33mail users for a similar service.

So picture this :

You are a business owner, Max, who has a number of employees who already have an email account but don’t have an email address at your business domain, say maxsbusiness.com.

Joan is one such employee and she already has a personal gmail account but has no idea how to set up a new email account for ‘sending mail as’ in gmail, along with Max not having the time or skillset to set it up for her.

Enter EmailEngine.io

Max sets up his domain on EmailEngine and adds the relevant DNS records, he then just creates a new email address for Joan forwarding to her gmail account and that’s it.

Joan will receive any emails sent to joan@maxsbusiness.com in her Gmail account as they are simply forwarded by EmailEngine, and she can just reply to them as she normally would, but any replies are routed through EmailEngine and the headers modified so that the reply will appear to come from joan@maxsbusiness.com rather than her gmail account.

EmailEngine also supports outgoing smtp if that needs to be set up but at its very simplest it provides a way to let people use business email addresses with zero setup on their side.

I have plans for further enhancements to the service in future but the basic service is now live.

You can check it out here and I would appreciate any feedback.

Pay with your favorite cryptocurrency

We have just enabled payments using cryptocurrencies other than Bitcoin via coinpayments.net. Just click the button on the invoice page and you will be brought to coinpayments.net to complete your premium or pro purchase using cryptocurrencies such as Ether, Dash, Monero and more.

If there is another crypto that you would like to pay with then let us know and we will do our best to enable it.

Check out our updated dashboard

The new site looks very similar to the old one but it has been completely rebuilt from the ground up using the same technology used to build Facebook. The new UI is more functional and much snappier to use. It will also make it much easier for us to add new features in the near future.

Features of note in the current release include :

  • Single page design which makes for a much snappier user experience
  • Full ssl support
  • Updated alias management tool33mail search
  • Simpler Block / Hide buttons33mailblockhide

We would love to hear your feedback on the new site and if you run into any bugs, If you do find a bug please let us know at support@33mail.com stating your username along with your os and browser versions.

Change your username, but only once.

We often get requests from users that want to change their username as they were not aware that it would be part of their 33mail email addresses when they originally signed up. To accommodate these users we have added a section to the Account Info page where you can change your username. You can only change your username once and when it is changed it is irreversible and any mails sent to your old username will NOT be forwarded onto you.

Capture

 

 

Anonymously reply to 33mail emails

We are happy to announce that we have just deployed anonymous reply as a Beta feature for all users.

When you’ve enabled anonymous replies on your account, you will be able to reply to the sender of emails without revealing your real email address to them.

anonreply

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a lite user you will be limited to a single anonymous reply for evaluation purposes. Premium and Pro users have a daily limit. To enable anonymous reply just login to your dashboard and go to Account Details. You will then see the Reply Settings section where you can enable Anonymous Reply and set a reply name which will be shown to anyone you reply to.

We would love to hear any feedback you have on this feature along with any problems or praise.

If you are not currently a user then sign up for 33mail here.

Two better habits when registering for websites

Hands up how many of you use the same password for more than one website? How many of you use the same password for most or all websites?

Hands up how many of you use your actual email address when signing up for websites?

If you raised your hand for either or both of these, we need to talk.

Let’s say you sign up for a website, and you give them your email address (perhaps a gmail account), and then give them a password that happens to be the same as your gmail password. It is now trivial for them to hack your Gmail account and spam your friends.

Even if you only sign up for reputable websites, they can be hacked, as happened recently with Gawker. Anyone who used the same password both for their email and for Gawker was immediately exposed, and their email address probably found its way onto hundreds of spammers mailing lists.

Additionally, let’s say you use several passwords (my previous approach). You then run into the problem that you often forget which password you used where, so you have to try several of them (potentially revealing all your passwords to an unscrupulous website).

Another annoyance is that some websites have weird requirements for passwords, often they must be at least 8 characters in length, and contain a mixture of letters and numbers. If your default passwords don’t meet these criteria then often you have to modify them somehow, or pick new passwords entirely, and then of course you can never remember which variations you used for particular websites.

So what to do? A simple approach I use, which isn’t foolproof, but which is a big improvement over what most people do, is to base my password in some way on the domain of the website I’m visiting.

For example, let’s say you are coming up with a password for plentyoffish.com. One approach you might take is to start with the last 4 letters of the main part of the domain in reverse order, capitalizing the final one. And then add an additional 4 characters that you’ll always remember – ideally a combination of letters and numbers. Here are some example passwords following this scheme (using “5yty” as the final 4 characters in each case):

Website Password
plentyoffish.com hsiF5yty
www.google.com elgO5yty
facebook.com kooB5yty

While initially it might take you a few seconds to figure out the appropriate password for any given website, with a little practice it quickly becomes second-nature.

The good thing about a password scheme like this is that these passwords will meet the criteria of even the most fussy websites, because they are 8 characters in length, I’ve never seen a website that required more than 8 character passwords. Additionally, the passwords contain a mixture of upper and lower case characters, and numbers.

Now please don’t copy the exact approach I describe here. Perhaps instead of taking the last 4 characters of the domain, take the 2nd, 4th, last, and 2nd last – or something like that. It doesn’t matter, so long as you remember it.

Of course a weakness of this approach is that someone looking at your password for their site might be able to reverse engineer your system, but this involves a lot more work on their part than if you use the same password everywhere.

If you are concerned about this you could make your system more difficult to reverse engineer by, say, incrementing the letters you take from the domain name, so “abcD” becomes “bcdE”. Of course, this is at the cost of making it more difficult to figure out the appropriate password for an appropriate domain.

And what about having to give websites your real email address?  Simple!  Don’t give them your real email address!

33Mail gives you your own domain, like @john.33mail.com.  Next time you visit a website that asks for your email address, instead of giving them your real email address, just make one up especially for them. For example, if the website is blahblah.com, you might give them blahblah@john.33mail.com.

You don’t need to do anything else, 33Mail will create an alias automatically the first time they try to send you an email, and we’ll forward any emails they send to you.

Later, if blahblah.com start to send you emails you don’t want, or even if they sell your email address to a spammer, just click on the link that we add to the top of every email we forward, 33Mail will kill their alias, and they won’t bother you any more.

Sign up for 33Mail.com to create a new email address for each website.

PS. You’ll also be able to figure out which website sold your email address so that you can warn other people!